theenergyissue:

The Energy Report: The Guide to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050
An illustrated report produced by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and AMO, the research wing of the architecture office OMA, presents a provocative scenario set in 2050 of a world run entirely on renewable energy. Two years in the making, the report features features maps, charts and images produced by AMO, and is bundled with a numbers-rich study by energy consultancy Ecofys. The Energy Report is unique in the way it combines rigorous scientific research and statistics with beautiful and evocative graphics, illustrating the way energy issues can—and should—be made accessible and engaging to a wider audience. The full report is available for download here.

theenergyissue:

The Energy Report: The Guide to 100% Renewable Energy by 2050

An illustrated report produced by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and AMO, the research wing of the architecture office OMA, presents a provocative scenario set in 2050 of a world run entirely on renewable energy. Two years in the making, the report features features maps, charts and images produced by AMO, and is bundled with a numbers-rich study by energy consultancy Ecofys. The Energy Report is unique in the way it combines rigorous scientific research and statistics with beautiful and evocative graphics, illustrating the way energy issues can—and should—be made accessible and engaging to a wider audience. The full report is available for download here.

design-is-fine:

Alexander Begge, chair Casalino, 1971. For Casala, Leverkusen, Germany. Source

criminalwisdom:

Photo by Sean Mundy

bobbycaputo:

The Mutated Body: Sculptural Photographs Depict Raw Intimacy

In 1884, in a small town in Arkansas, Michael Meyers was born, the sixth of seven children in a German immigrant family of farmers. Going against the grain of his upbringing, Meyers worked as a commercial portrait photographer, and, in 1939, changed his name to “Disfarmer.” Little is known about the reclusive Disfarmer, though having him take your picture in his Main Street studio in Heber Springs, Arkansas, was a main attraction. When Disfarmer passed away in 1959, a retired Army engineer named Joe Albright bought the old studio and it’s contents. According to the Disfarmer website, Albright found thousands of dollars (cash) hidden in film plate boxes, and over 3,000 glass plate negatives, which he put in storage. 

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wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Wet Cities by Christophe Jacrot

French photographer Christophe Jacrot takes us out on the streets when most of us prefer staying sheltered. He captures the raw, stunning souls of Paris, New York and other cities in a different way, with artistic purpose in magical yet in-climate weather conditions.  

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bobbycaputo:

Annie Marie Musselman’s “Finding Trust”

Shortly after her mother died, Annie Marie Musselman started photographing injured animals at the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center, in Arlington, Washington. “Seeing the animals suffer and very often die helped me see that death is a very important process of life,” she said. The center’s patients often include raccoons and barn owls hit by cars, baby possums from abandoned nests, and eastern gray squirrels injured by cats. Musselman has also seen some stranger cases: a South American coatimundi, two overweight brown bears used to transport drugs from Canada, and a red-tailed hawk shot by an arrow.

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timelightbox:

Photo by Stuart Palley
Chasing Blazes: Sublime Photos of Wildfires
Photographer Stuart Palley’s summer evenings are spent chasing wildfires in Southern California. He tells TIME LightBox how he learned to handle the heat.

timelightbox:

Photo by Stuart Palley

Chasing Blazes: Sublime Photos of Wildfires

Photographer Stuart Palley’s summer evenings are spent chasing wildfires in Southern California. He tells TIME LightBox how he learned to handle the heat.

bobbycaputo:

This is a Cut and Polished Chinga Meteorite

Seen here is a 773 gram polished Chinga meteorite. The quarter-cut specimen was found in Turvinskaya, Russia and has been cut and polished on two sides. The rest of the meteorite retains its natural light brown crust, creating a dramatic contrast. This particular specimen, which was offered by Arizona Skies Meteorites has been sold, but more of this meteorite can be found online.

The Chinga meteorite is an iron meteorite and its total chemical composition is: 82.8% iron, 16.6% nickel, and the rest mostly cobalt and phosphorus. Fragments of the meteorite were found in 1913 by gold diggers in Tuva near the Chinge River after which it is named. (Via.)